Brexit is a sympton of Europe's problems

Brexit is a sympton of Europe's problems

by ANNA MARIA ANDERS

Three decades after the fall of the Berlin wall, Europe is once again at a crossroads. In 1989 and the years that followed, the Soviet Union ceased to exist and Germany was unified. The newly independent, once Communist states – including my home country of Poland – embarked on the road to democracy, free markets, and the rule of law. Poland was welcomed back into the European family, and we joined the ranks of Nato. But Europe now faces a threat to its hard-won unity.

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Beyond the "fantacism of the center"

Beyond the "fantacism of the center"

by DANIEL J. MAHONEY

In elite political and intellectual circles, a consensus has emerged: a dangerous populism, bordering on fascism and the worst political currents of the 1930s, is haunting Europe, Britain, and the United States. The election of Donald Trump, the prospect of a British exit from a Euro-Behemoth, and the rise of populist parties in France, Italy, and Austria are major pieces of evidence for the prosecution. In this narrative, contemporary “democracy,” pure and innocent, and beyond reproach, is under assault from new authoritarians. But there is no evidence that any of these developments or movements has threatened, or will threaten, public liberties.

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Let's celebrate NATO. It stands between the free world and tyranny.

Let's celebrate NATO.  It stands between the free world and tyranny.

by ANNA MARIA ANDERS

Representatives of all NATO member states are gathering in Washington this week to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the longest-lasting military alliance in modern history. Created on April 4, 1949, to counter the threat of Soviet Communism in the aftermath of World War II, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization is as important today as it was in the year of its founding.

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How a Russian gas pipeline is driving a wedge between the U.S and its allies

How a Russian gas pipeline is driving a wedge between the U.S and its allies

by BOJAN PANCEVSKI

Angela Merkel and her advisers, before a visit to the White House last spring, agreed on a priority: Avoid talk of Nord Stream 2. The German-Russian pipeline project had been a bone of contention between Berlin and Washington, which fears it will make Europe’s largest economy excessively reliant on Russian energy.

When the German chancellor took her seat at the Oval Office table, though, President Trump left her nowhere to hide. “Angela,” he said, according to people in the room, “you got to stop buying gas from Putin.”

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